Ions in Nature

Surround Air Ionizer Benefits

Witches Winds | The Ion Balance | Ions in Nature | Ions in Our Cities | Ions in General

Although humanity has done the most to produce unhealthy ion levels, nature itself often produces over doses of both kinds of ion. Positive ions can be produced by various kinds of friction: between air masses, between layers of wind, between the air and the ground over which it is blowing, between the air and sand or dirt particles swept up by the wind, between the weather fronts that march endlessly across the face of the globe. Friction tends to knock off the negative electrons and produce an overdose of positive ions. On a dusty or humid day this overdose may be massive because the negative ions promplty attach themselves to particles of dust, pollution or moisture and lose their charge.

The weather changes when one atmospeheric front is shoved out of the way by another. If there are rain clouds, the rubbing of the new front against the old, and of cloud against cloud, commonly causes thunderstorms because the rubbing sets up a positive charge that flashes to the negatively charged earth as lightning, destroying the overdose of positive ions as it does so.

But the electrical distrubance moves faster than the weather front, so that in the hours or days before the arrival of an electrical storm the air is overloaded with positive ions. It is these that cause animals to be restive and insects to erupt suddenly with an explosion of energy and become a plague instead of just a nuisance. It is part of the lore of humanity everywhere that if livestock is restless and the bugs begin to bite more than usual, then a storm is probably on the way. Scientists studying the incidence of insect activity in laboratories have now provided the scientific reason why: Positive ion overdoses affect the body chemistry of all creatures.

When the storm has passed, however, the air is fresh and clean and invigorating. Most of us feel vigorous and refreshed and at peace with the newly washed world. The reason seems self-evident; The storm has passed. But again, scientists have demonstrated that the storm's passage has cleared the air of positive ions. What is left in the wake of the storm is a gloriously tranquilizing overdose of negative ions that eases tension and presures and leaves us full of energy.

There are also circumstances in nature that create overdoses of the negative ions that are good for you. In certain hill and mountain areas, for instance, a combination of the sun's rays, cleaner air, and rock strata that are more radioactive than most of the earth's surface can produce high concentrations of both kinds of ions, with the balance swinging heavily in favor of negative ions. In part this is because in the mountains there is less dust in the air to consume the negative ions. It is no coincidence that throughout history mankind has gone to hilly areas to rest and recuperate, particularly from respiratory diseases.

The energy in moving water also generates a lot of negative ions. As water breaks up, the positive charge remains with the larger drop and the negative charges flies free with the fine spray, forming negative ions. By the seashore, where waves bounce on beaches or hiss and sputter against rocks, there are always more negative ions than positive ions. Waterfalls, too are surrounded by a beneficial load of negative ions created by the same process. The easily measurable negative charge in the air of Yosemite Valley is said by physicists from Stanford Research Institute to be due to the famous waterfall there. Niagara Falls where the negative ion count exceeds 100,000 per cubic centimeter, is the most stupendous negative ion generator in the world. This is why a shower in the morning is so refreshing; the man made mini waterfall produces a massive overdose of negative ions.

Although humanity has done the most to produce unhealthy ion levels, nature itself often produces over doses of both kinds of ion. Positive ions can be produced by various kinds of friction: between air masses, between layers of wind, between the air and the ground over which it is blowing, between the air and sand or dirt particles swept up by the wind, between the weather fronts that march endlessly across the face of the globe. Friction tends to knock off the negative electrons and produce an overdose of positive ions. On a dusty or humid day this overdose may be massive because the negative ions promplty attach themselves to particles of dust, pollution or moisture and lose their charge.

The weather changes when one atmospeheric front is shoved out of the way by another. If there are rain clouds, the rubbing of the new front against the old, and of cloud against cloud, commonly causes thunderstorms because the rubbing sets up a positive charge that flashes to the negatively charged earth as lightning, destroying the overdose of positive ions as it does so.

But the electrical distrubance moves faster than the weather front, so that in the hours or days before the arrival of an electrical storm the air is overloaded with positive ions. It is these that cause animals to be restive and insects to erupt suddenly with an explosion of energy and become a plague instead of just a nuisance. It is part of the lore of humanity everywhere that if livestock is restless and the bugs begin to bite more than usual, then a storm is probably on the way. Scientists studying the incidence of insect activity in laboratories have now provided the scientific reason why: Positive ion overdoses affect the body chemistry of all creatures.

When the storm has passed, however, the air is fresh and clean and invigorating. Most of us feel vigorous and refreshed and at peace with the newly washed world. The reason seems self-evident; The storm has passed. But again, scientists have demonstrated that the storm's passage has cleared the air of positive ions. What is left in the wake of the storm is a gloriously tranquilizing overdose of negative ions that eases tension and presures and leaves us full of energy.

There are also circumstances in nature that create overdoses of the negative ions that are good for you. In certain hill and mountain areas, for instance, a combination of the sun's rays, cleaner air, and rock strata that are more radioactive than most of the earth's surface can produce high concentrations of both kinds of ions, with the balance swinging heavily in favor of negative ions. In part this is because in the mountains there is less dust in the air to consume the negative ions. It is no coincidence that throughout history mankind has gone to hilly areas to rest and recuperate, particularly from respiratory diseases.

The energy in moving water also generates a lot of negative ions. As water breaks up, the positive charge remains with the larger drop and the negative charges flies free with the fine spray, forming negative ions. By the seashore, where waves bounce on beaches or hiss and sputter against rocks, there are always more negative ions than positive ions. Waterfalls, too are surrounded by a beneficial load of negative ions created by the same process. The easily measurable negative charge in the air of Yosemite Valley is said by physicists from Stanford Research Institute to be due to the famous waterfall there. Niagara Falls where the negative ion count exceeds 100,000 per cubic centimeter, is the most stupendous negative ion generator in the world. This is why a shower in the morning is so refreshing; the man made mini waterfall produces a massive overdose of negative ions.

Excerpts from "The Ion Effect" by Fred Soyka